Amy Shark has become famous after her song Adore made it into the top 2 of Triple J’s Hottest 100. The iconic sound of Drive You Mad started the show with high anticipation as Amy Shark came onto stage for her sold out show at The Gov on Friday night. The all-age crowd was restless and ready to be taken on a ride to end the week.

The mood created with the opening number was a promising but mellow start. Backed only by a two-piece band of a drummer, and keyboard or bass player as required, her voice was not overwhelmed by noise and allowed to deliver with clarity. Coming at the end of her Australian tour, it clearly demonstrated she has had time to finesse her stage performance and her voice is polished and consistent, no different to listening to the tracks at home.

Shark’s ability to translate angst and teenage themes through indie-pop has mass appeal to the younger crowd who were in attendance and resonate with her songs. How you much you appreciate her vulnerability shown through the lyrical themes from her debut album, Night Thinker, depends on your ability to relate.

Worst Girl brought down the mood followed by the drastically different mood of, Blood Brothers. One of her more well-known songs, with the crowd showing familiarity and singing along as Shark starts to dance without abandon.

Shark’s cover of her favourite artist, Eminem’s Superman, was a different feel, putting her gentle melodious voice to an otherwise brusque sounding song and helped to break up the set.

Shark’s attempts to get the crowd in the mood encouraging dancing at various times failed as the show didn’t build, but rather jumped from upbeat to gloomy from song to song. The popular songs such as Golden Fleece and Deleted, interspersed with less familiar ones made it a challenge to build momentum with the audience. Her captivating smile and engaging stories, make some allowances for this.

Weekend lifted the energy of the crowd, before finishing the show with the song that everyone was waiting for, Adore much to the crowd’s appreciation, singing in unison and leaving the venue. The moody indie-style of music would have been better suited to an outdoor music festival than the rock venue of The Gov.

The Gold Coast singer-songwriter became famous on the back of one song, Adore, has yet to demonstrate her ability to cover themes more than teenage angst and heart break. With a distinctive voice that delivers and performs well , here’s hoping her next album proves she is more than a one-hit wonder.

Review by Ilona Schultz